Exim commands : To remove emails from mail queue for a specific Sender/Receiver

In this article Hostdens will show you how to remove emails from mail queue for a specific Sender/Receiver.

exim-vps

How to remove all emails from a particular user using exiqgrep?

Do follow this command:

# exiqgrep -i -f $user | xargs exim -Mrm

                                                 Or

 

How to remove all emails to a particular user using exiqgrep?

Do follow this command:

# exiqgrep -i -r $user | xargs exim -Mrm

 

That’s it :-) :-)

 

Exim related post

 

Read More

Exim Commands : Searching the queue with exiqgrep

Searching the queue with exiqgrep

Exim-Commands-Searching-the-queue-with-exiqgrep

 

 

In this article Hostdens will explain the command usages for finding emails in Exim mail queue for particular sender or receiver.

Exim includes a utility that is quite nice for grepping through the queue, called exiqgrep. Learn it. Know it. Live it. If you’re not using this, and if you’re not familiar with the various flags it uses, you’re probably doing things the hard way, like piping `exim -bp` into awk, grep, cut, or `wc -l`. Don’t make life harder than it already is.

First, various flags that control what messages are matched. These can be combined to come up with a very particular search.

 

1) Use -f ( To search the queue for messages from a specific sender )

Command :

 

root@localhost# exiqgrep -f [luser]@domain

 

2) Use -r ( To search the queue for messages for a specific recipient/domain )

Command :

 

root@localhost# exiqgrep -r [luser]@domain

 

3) Use -o ( To print messages older than the specified number of seconds. For example, messages older than 1 day )

Command :

 

root@localhost# exiqgrep -o 86400 […]

 

4) Use -y ( To print messages that are younger than the specified number of seconds. For example, messages less than an hour old )

Command :

 

root@localhost# exiqgrep -y 3600 […]

 

5) Use -s ( To match the size of a message with a regex. For example, 700-799 bytes )

Command :

 

root@localhost# exiqgrep -s ‘^7..$’ […]

 

“^3$” –> 3bytes
“^3.$” –> 3-30bytes
“^3..$” –> 3-300bytes
“^3…$” –> 3-3000bytes
And so on..

 

6) Use -z ( To match only frozen messages )

 

7) Use -x ( To match only unfrozen messages )

 

There are also a few flags that control the display of the output.

 

8) Use -i ( To print just the message-id as a result of one of the above two searches )

Command :

 

root@localhost# exiqgrep -i [ -r | -f ] …

 

9) Use -c ( To print a count of messages matching one of the above searches )

Command :

 

root@localhost# exiqgrep -c …

 

10) Print just the message-id of the entire queue

Command :

 

root@localhost# exiqgrep -i

 

That’s it :-) :-)

 

Exim related post

 

 

Read More

Useful Exim Commands

Useful Exim Commands

 

Exim is a message transfer agent (MTA) for hosts that are highly comfortable and running in Unix or Linux Operating system. Exim server is developed at the University of Cambridge. We can easily manage and configure in server. In this article Hostdens will explain few executable commands as below.

 

1) Print a count of the messages in the queue, use the following command line : 

root@localhost# exim -bpc

 

2) Print a listing of the messages in the queue (time queued, size, message-id, sender, recipient), use the following command line : 

root@localhost# exim -bp

 

3) Print a summary of messages in the queue (count, volume, oldest, newest, domain, and totals), use the following command line : 

root@localhost# exim -bp | exiqsumm

 

4) Print what Exim is doing right now, use the following command line : 

root@localhost# exiwhat

exim-vps

5) Test how exim will route a given address, use the following command line : 

root@localhost# exim -bt test@ownmyserver.com
user@thishost.com
<– test@ownmyserver.com
router = localuser, transport = local_delivery
root@localhost# exim -bt user@thishost.com
user@thishost.com
router = localuser, transport = local_delivery
root@localhost# exim -bt user@remotehost.com
router = lookuphost, transport = remote_smtp
host mail.remotehost.com [1.2.3.4] MX=0

 

6) Run a pretend SMTP transaction from the command line, as if it were coming from the given IP address. This will display Exim’s checks, ACLs, and filters as they are applied. The message will NOT actually be delivered, use the following command line : 

root@localhost# exim -bh 192.168.11.22

 

7) Display all of Exim’s configuration settings, use the following command line : 

root@localhost# exim -bP

Read More

How to Create a StartSSL Certificate on StartSSL Control Panel

To Create a StartSSL Certificate

In this article Hostdens will give you how you can easily Create a StartSSL  Certificate on StartSSL Control Panel. Follow the steps and create a StartSSL Certificate.

Create a StartSSL Certificate

 

Step 1 : Login to the StartSSL Control Panel.

Step 2 : Select the Validations Wizard tab.

Step 3 : Select Domain Name.

Step 4 : Click on Continue button.

Step 5 : Then enter the top domain name, and select the domain name extension.

Step 6 : Click on Continue button.

Step 7 : Select the email address for verification of domain name.

Step 8 : Click on Continue button.

Step 9 : Then enter the verification code you received by mail into the the field. 

Step 10 : Click on Finish button. 

Step 11 : Select the Certificates Wizard tab.

Step 12 : Select SSL/TLS Server Certificate.

Step 13 : Click on Continue button.

Step 14 : Then enter a password ( at least 10 characters ).

Step 15 : Click on Continue button. 

Step 16 : Save the private key.

Step 17 : Click on Continue button.

Step 18 : Select the domain name from the drop-down box.

Step 19 : Click on Continue button.

Step 20 : Then add a sub domain name.

 Step 21 : Click on Continue button. 

Step 22 : Save the certificate.

Step 23 : Click on Finish button.

Step 24 : Select the Tool Box tab.

Step 25 : Click on Decrypt Private Key.

Step 26 : Then enter the content of the private key and supply the password.

Step 27 : And finally Save the decrypted private key.

 

 

That’s it!

Read More